Back to 6mm gaming

After fart-arsing around with many different wargaming ideas for the last few months, including playing my Market Garden campaign with hex and counter just to keep it rolling, my 6mm mojo has been reactivated.

Thus we are back in the Shedquarters building a new battlefield.

Battlefield under construction

Getting the look right

Sometimes I play my wargames with mediocre models on mediocre terrain, but not often.

Nowadays a lot of my games are played using home-produced gaming tokens on a recycled board game map.  I would like to spend more time creating good terrain with good models, but I seem to have to many irons in the fire.

However, when I do play a “proper” game with 6mm models, I like to get the look of the thing as good as I can.  For example, this is from an e-mail campaign of Operation Sealion, the German invasion of Britain in 1940.

The German player was sent three “postcards” before the game, on the basis that they had been found for sale in the post office at Lewes, captured the previous evening.  These photographs are taken directly from the 1:285 scale wargame table.  Only the “sky” has been blurred to remove the background shed planking.

 

 

Wargaming Update

So what have I been up to since my last post?

I have started to keep a log of my painting and modelling work, which helps me to keep on track with my resolution to paint something every day.

I have also resolved to be more patient with my painting, leaving stuff for up to a day before the next paint application.

I have been preparing SS Panzer Grenadiers for the Market Garden campaign, with late war camouflage smocks (not the only chaps wearing the wrong camouflage for the location!).  In addition, these chaps are getting an urban base cover instead of the normal grass.

In the last couple of days I have been more dedicated to creating the terrain hexagons needed for the latest game.

A modelling dilemma

For my next “Market Garden” battle I have a large rail bridge for which I already have one straight rail hexagon tile embanked to the correct height.

My problem is that I also have two road/rail crossing points to create. I already have these crossings at normal ground level.

Option 1.  I make sloping railway hexagons to drop a height of 12mm over 10cm, which is a far steeper gradient than would look realistic.

Option 2. I keep the railway embanked at 12mm height and create bridges (real or indicated by painting) beneath for the roads. To do this I might need to carve beneath the normal terrain level to make a useable bridge.

The photo shows a Sherman tank (based) with the current embankment and a normal ground level railway, and an indication of the slope required for option 1.

Nominal ground scale is 1:2500, but vertical scale is 1:285.

I think that by setting up a mock-up and having seen the result I use the exaggerated slope method. So now all I need to do is to make two convincing sloped embankments and fit (and paint) the rail tracks..

The number of bespoke Kallistra hexagons in my collection is getting a little worrying, but it is keeping two companies in business – Kallistra and Really Useful Boxes!

Market Garden:terrain modelling

This evening I have been transferring, in the dark, terrain hexagons between ManCave2 (storage and preparation) and ManCave1 (playing area).  However, it appears that I am not able to make the necessary terrain (a 3 hex wide river) without some further modelling.

Effectively I need 22 hexagons with a river covering about 80% of the hex but grassy banks on one point.

Back to ManCave2 to reconfigure several of my former English Channel hex tiles…