More on German tugs

As an afterthought to yesterday’s post I got out the kit pieces and tried various deck layout configurations for a second steam tug.

I think that I will try this one, with a few nautical accessories.

Kit components seeking inspirational use.
Kit components seeking inspirational use.

But things keep getting better! At the top of the picture are two river boat hulls, which just happen to be the correct dimensions for a German catamaran ferry or floating gun platform in 1:300 scale.

It looks like my 19th century Americans will need to wait for a boat trip up the Mississippi.

A little something to help the Germans along.

From my previous posts you see that I have built something to put the panzers in to get them across the channel.  But those barges won’t move themselves, so what to do?

I found on Amazon these models at a very cheap price so I snapped up the last two.

The basic models
The basic models

My game is in 6mm (1:285/1:300) and these models claim to be 1:400, but with a little tweaking I have produced a slightly smaller steam tug about 26m in length.  The crew will need to duck to enter the bridge, but no more so than with many of my model houses.  My models wear their steel helmets mainly to avoid concussion from low doorways.

The kit is made of fewer than twenty pieces.  I cut the hull down to the waterline, omitted some lights, moved the mast and replaced the funnel with one made of spare sprue with one end drilled.  For added effect I scored planks into the deck.

A small steam tug
A small steam tug

Sorted.  One done, one to go.  And as a bonus I have two river boat kits to transport my ACW troops.

On second thoughts, I may be able to combine parts from the tug and the river boat to make a different design.

Operation Sealion: German barges part two

Barges ready to transport tanks to Britain September 1940
Barges ready to transport tanks to Britain September 1940

After a splash of paint, a dirty wash and the addition of fenders made from slices of paint brush protectors, they look half decent.  I could not round off the rear ends properly because of the hollow  moulding method.

The barge at the front is awaiting the arrival of some model railway pallets to give it a front door / ramp.

Not at all perfect (just like in 1940), but they will do for my purposes.

 

Last week I have been mostly – drawing maps

I have recently revised my approach to the Peninsular War e-mail campaign to try to engage the players a bit more.

Rather than insist they sit in their HQs awaiting reports of engagements they never saw, now whenever there is a contact on the master map between any more than scouts and messengers I will prepare a detailed game map of the 10 mile x 10 mile map square.

My copy is gridded in hexagons so that any part may be quickly copied to a wargame table or the Commands & Colors board as required.  The player in residence or who has scouted the area will receive a tracing, gridded in 1 mile squares.  The player entering the area will receive a tracing of the main roads and rivers, town and hilly areas.  The players are then demoted to the position of the senior man on the spot and asked for orders.

Results of any ensuing conflict will not be known to the player until he receives the local commander’s report or reads about it in the newspapers.

Sample map for the occupying player
Sample map for the occupying player
Sample map for invading player
Sample map for invading player

Added to this activity I have (some might say foolishly) started up another campaign to umpire.  Trying to get away from always playing Napoleonic games I resurrected my Operation Sealion campaign.  I started to play this solo some time ago, but thought an opponent would be a good idea.  Then I realised that there could be no secrecy, so I found a second player and I am now the umpire.

This campaign is run using a linked area system with 65 defined 6ft x 4ft tabletops.  I have a campaign book with the orders of battle and small maps of the areas.  I have started to create the maps for the game using the drawing tools in Microsoft Excel.  I use this tool because it enables me to add positions of troops later and to annotate the map using the “comments” function. Also I can keep all the maps, orders of battle, timelines and notes in one editable file.

Here is a sample map, gridded in 1 foot squares for the players and hexagons for me.

A wargaming map created in Excel
A wargaming map created in Excel

Confused? I am

At some point in the past I have picked up, probably from a bring and buy at a Wargame show, a German DFS230 glider in 1:300 scale.

So why is it painted with allied 1944 invasion black/white stripes?  Recovered from Holland in 1940, returned to the UK and repainted for use in 1944?  I think probably not :-).

So, when the new models arrive for my “Operation Sealion” campaign, it will be added to the pile of lead and at some point repainted.