Market Garden. 18th September 1944, 18:00

Three battalions of Kamfgruppe von Tettau attacked the British re-supply drop zones.
The British had two light artillery regiments and a parachute battalion, who had been ordered to abandon the drop zone and move to the west to consolidate with troops in Arnhem.

The attack started with 1st Battalion, KG von Tettau, advancing on the right flank while the 2nd Battalion used their 75mm guns against the British artillery emplacements.

The British artillery fired on the attackers but with no noticeable effect. The Observation officer for 2nd Airlanded Light Artillery Regiment arrived and set up an OP on the forward slope from the road.

By 18:15 the German infantry had moved within small arms range of the British artillery positions and opened fire. the 75mm battery was disordered and unable to return fire. The 6pr battery fell back in disorder, abandoning their prepared positions. The German infantry continued to advance.

The 2nd Regiment OP called up fire against the Germans who had taken over the 6pr positions, but few casualties were inflicted.

The Germans now opened fire against the retreating British 6pr battery with rifles, mortars and 37mm AT guns. The British guns were eliminated. On the right flank an assault was mounted against the 75mm howitzer battery. One troop was destroyed Nd the second retreated.

2nd Airlanded Regiment RA began to move along the road towards Arnhem.

British artillery fire was inconclusive. The Germans made a few forward moves.

18:27. The Germans opened fire on the retreating British artillery and another 6pr troop was eliminated. On the German right flank the infantry attacked and destroyed one 75mm gun troop and forced a second to retreat. The British focus was now on getting as many units as possible away to the east.

The battle continued with the British trying to escape along the road to the east, towards Arnhem, as the Germans closed in from the south and west.

The artillery OP was overrun, but most of the remaining troops managed to evacuate the area. 156th Parachute Battalion suffered no casualties, but the airborne light artillery lost their HQ, 3 75mm troops and 2 6pr troops (approximately 30% casualties). The Germans came away with negligible casualties.

Market Garden. Feeling pleased

I have had a major clear out and tidy up of the Shedquarters, because tomorrow a group of young local lads will be visiting the Shedquarters to try their hand at a wargame for the first time. I am chucking one of them in at the deep end, as he has one company of Polish paratroopers with a 20mm AT gun against three companies of PanzerGrenadiers, one company of recruits and three batteries of medium/heavy artillery.

But they are hiding in the ruins of what used to be Arnhem. some pictures follow:

But still somehow this all looks too neat and tidy. I have to leave room to place the troop bases, but I would sill prefer a more “organic” look, especially after the destruction. The “aerial” shots make it look like the bulldozers have been in and it’s at least a month after the battle.

Ideas anyone???

Positives and negatives

While I am quite pleased to find that I have almost enough buildings to cover three quarters of my table with ruins and intact buildings representing Arnhem after two days of conflict, at the same time I am disappointed that some of my more appropriate models still languish in the “to paint” box.

Final details like walls, gardens, trees, telegraph poles, etc. are to be added tomorrow before I attempt to introduce some local kids to the joys of “real” wargaming, rather than just pushing 1:35 tanks around the grass verges on the estate.

Apologies for the photo’ quality. Taken using an i-pad, floodlit by 3 multiple-LED work lights just after dusk.

Market Garden: Action at Arnhem Railway Bridge

I played a quick action today of a German attack across the railway bridge at Arnhem.
The rules were my adapted version of Richard Borg’s Memoir ’44.
The only adaptation in use today was that the number of command cards held was a factor of the number of platoon-sized bases on the table. As casualties are suffered or re-inforcements arrive the number of cards held will fluctuate.

The picture shows the view from the south (German) side of the bridge.
3rd PanzerGrenadier Battalion was attacking across the bridge against 7th Battalion King’s Own Scottish Borderers (KOSBs). They were supported by 2nd PanzerGrenadier Battalion attacking from the east, on the north side of the Rhine.
7th KOSBs had the potential support of 10th Battalion Parachute Regiment from the north, but at the start of the action, at 18:00 on 18th September, the British were outnumbered 2:1.

At this point I must apologise to my PBEM generals for a basic error. The actual forces on each side were company sized, but I forgot and placed them at battalion size. However, it made for a more interesting battle and the result is perfectly acceptable for the campaign.

The Germans commenced with a mortar attack in support of an infantry assault across the bridge. At the same time 2nd Battalion advanced from the east. The British responded by a double counter-charge supported by mortars. The counter-attack across the bridge was partially successful but on the east flank the enemy was driven back with heavy casualties.

2nd PanzerGrenadier Battalion recovered and attacked again, surrounding the British company and eliminating it. 3rd PanzerGrenadier Battalion, with the help of their mortar platoon, gradually wore down the British on the railway bridge, then after around 45 minutes fighting both battalions surged forwards, surrounding the last elements of the KOSBs, who had been unable to withdraw to the comparative safety of Oosterbeek.

10th Battalion Parachute Regiment never appeared.

Casualties (dead,wounded and missing): British 100%, Germans 26%

Wargame Progress – Market Garden

Back into my 6mm gaming mode I am setting up the battlefield for the next game in the Market Garden campaign.

About 1/6 of the table is a built-up area and I have populated it with a set of model buildings from my store. Some of these are most inappropriate for the Netherlands, particularly the Kentish oast houses, but I am taking the opportunity to paint every building taken from the box before replacing the wrong’uns with more geographically relevant structures.

So for the time being, the area looks like this:

This is a mixture of buildings from Various manufacturers and some home printed models.

Painting continues…

On the horns of a multilemma

Before I start, I should explain that a multilemma is a bit like a dilemma, but with more options.


Mythically a Multilemma is a creature with horns that grow in a manner similar to a “monkey-puzzle” tree. Once every 1500 years it migrates to the coast (normally Bournemouth or Torquay) to indulge in a bit of sea-bathing, in the process of which it invariably drowns due to the weight of the horns when soaked in salt water. (yes: I made that up, just like the folks at Games Workshop used to do.)

But for our purposes a multilemma is the situation that I face.
In my campaign I have a company of German PanzerGrenadiers in 1944 facing a company of British Glider Infantry, across a bridge. To the right (from the German viewpoint) of the enemy is another company of PanzerGrenadiers, but to their right is a company of British Parachute infantry. The company commander of the southern unit has (by rolling a 6) decided to attack.

My problem is how to play this engagement:

  1. A simple die roll, taking into account the support companies.
  2. Hex and counter boardgame. Each company is 4 counters. 1 hex = 250m. Rules: Memoir ’44.*
  3. 6mm models on hex terrain (similar to option 2 but wth 3D detail), in which case I will probably need to do some terrain building. Rules: Probably Memoir ’44, and my preferred option.
  4. 20mm. I would need to substitute American soldier models for British. As for rules, I have several possibilities. I would probably have to make some quite a lot of terrain, including a river and a rail bridge. Chain of Command rules?
  5. Counters as Sections/Squads with Squad Leader boards and local rules.
  6. Counters as Sections/Squads with Squad Leader boards and 1970s (not Squad Leader) rules.
  • Option 2 has been the normal recent method of resolving engagements, but can be somewhat boring, particularly with small engagements.

So far, from the above, I have a Sexilemma. Not something that I would wish to meet in a wood on a dark night!
But it is looking to me as if the answer may be D6-based. Before I roll the die( and a D3 or a D6) any suggestions?

Thanks for any input.