A storage solution

Over the last few years I have bought several of Richard Borg’s games based on the “Commands & Colors” format.  These games contain a lot of cardboard terrain hexagon tiles, but are not very good at providing storage for them, particularly once one begins to acquire expansion sets.

My particular bug-bear is Memoir’44, which does provide storage boxes, but made in a way that makes the tiles difficult to extract, and they are quite flimsy.

And so I have pressed my 3d printer into service, and using the online free design program “Tinkercad”. I have created my own boxes.

Each of these holds 36 double-sided tiles, and should fit nicely into a Really Useful Box (we shall see when I have printed enough of them).  I might get organised enough to label them, but that’s a job for another day!

The downside is that each one takes over four hours to print.

When I have enough of these I will try making boxes for the rectangular terrain elements like bridges and bunkers, and maybe even circular ones for the counters.

Two small battles and some conclusions

Yesterday I was lucky to have my old re-enactment friend Chris Scott available to play out a couple of actions from the Peninsular War campaign.

In the first he had a personal interest.  He plays the role of Don Cristobal d’Escozia, the renowned commander of all guerrillas in Spain (and the only fictitious overall commander in the game).  One of his sub-commanders with orders to capture some French cannon decided to ambush them en route in broad daylight.

We played the game using 6mm miniatures on a hexagon terrain board, using Commands & Colors Napoleonics rules.  I had to invent characteristics for the guerrillas, and as they would be outnumbered 4:1 I was generous.  They had all the advantages of light Infantry in firing, the advantage of French Line in mêlée and could use rugged hills (normally prohibited) with the same protection as villages.  Also, they has one base per 12 men whereas their opponents had one base per 24 or 36, according to type.

I was disappointed that I had not had time to paint up the Neapolitan Light Infantry from my Baccus collection, but I had loads of Irregular Miniatures chaps based up as French Light Infantry, so with a quick flag repaint they were ready, and due to scale differences I used the same manufacturer throughout, except the Guerrilla leader who is a splendid chap by Heroics & Ros that I bought, fully painted complete with leopard skin cloak, in the distant past.

Guerrillas in the mist. The commander with some of his brave chaps.
Guerrillas in the mist. The commander with some of his brave chaps.

And so to the game.

Both sides were given the same territorial objective.  To get the two gun models and two caisson models under their own control beyond the river using one of two bridges.  Each would count 1 Victory Banner.  The game would be won by the first to gain five banners, so at least one enemy unit had to be eliminated.

Chris insisted that this battle would not have happened, but I replied that he himself had ordered the capture of the guns, and his subordinate had decided an ambush would succeed. (Under my campaign rules with those odds, rash temperament and with imperative orders he needed to draw an ace or a two from “Señor Decacardes” and a two was drawn.)

The French column marches into the trap.
The French column marches into the trap.  The Guerrillas start to search for a better mousetrap.

Despite routing the first two Neapolitan companies in the column, the ambush party was surrounded and annihilated in the woods.  The other guerrillas moved into the village in blocking positions, except one company that (due to the lousy hand of cards held by Chris) was left out in the open to be picked off.

I drew a lucky card allowing a strategic move and got the guns onto the hill overlooking the village.  Two guerrilla bands attacked them (before they were deployed) but rolled appallingly and failed to hit anything, while in both cases the guns replied with devastating effect.

We both agreed that the rules for this cannot be correct.  Even allowing for the effect of canister at short range if frontally attacked the artillery have too much power.  We were playing with miniatures, so the tactical situation was different to that of the board game, but I ruled that in future.

“Artillery when battling back in mêlée, unless attacked frontally and having already fired from their current position, will battle using only one die.”

The final result was that the Guerrillas lost three units (11 of their original 16 bases).  One company of Neapolitan troops was destroyed and a second ran for the hills (overall French loss 7 of 24 bases).  The Guerrillas withdrew from the field, so technically it was a draw.

Following this engagement I have also changed the way that Guerrillas will operate in the campaign.

If they encounter a lone ADC or a party of enemy less than half their own strength I will adjudicate the event with a couple of card draws to determine losses (if any) on each side, as I previously did whatever the odds.

Otherwise if a party of guerrillas is in the same map square (10 miles x 10 miles), the enemy will be moved backwards along his intended route by 1 mile per 25 guerrillas (actually calculated with a finer degree of accuracy in my records).

This will represent the delays caused by ambushes, the necessity to scout ahead for ambushes and other disruptive activity.

As an example a band of 100 guerrillas could slow an unencumbered infantry battalion from 20 miles per day to 16 miles per day on good roads, and from 12 miles per day to 8 miles per day in the mountains.

And so, having very quickly resolved this encounter, Chris offered to assist with another that had arisen in the previous 24 hours.

In this battle the vanguard of an Anglo-Portuguese Force has approached a well-defended town in Portugal. They have observed and fallen back to await the rest of the division.

However the French spotted the column and have sent a strong battalion out to investigate.  They know there are wagons to be captured (but the British officer has withdrawn them to safety).

Both commanders gave orders to try to outflank the enemy to the east side of the approach road, which was an increasingly steep ridge. And so the situation is that a battalion of around 600 Portuguese infantry, with separated pickets on the hills, faces a battalion of around 1100 French, of whom one third have been ordered to outflank the enemy by using the hills

The opening move with Portuguese pickets on the slopes and the French starting their flanking manoeuvre
The opening move with Portuguese pickets on the slopes and the French starting their flanking manoeuvre

Although the Portuguese had orders to hold the position, seeing the isolated French force, I sent them forward.  They had some success, but Chris moved the rest of the French battalion to the left and drove them back with heavy casualties.

In the nick of time a British battalion arrived on the road from the south, and a second arrived beyond the ridge to the east (unseen by the French).  The French decided that enough was enough and withdrew

The end of the affair. The Portuguese have fallen back defeated, the British are advancing and the French have quit the field.
The end of the affair. The Portuguese have fallen back defeated, the British are advancing and the French have quit the field.

Last week I have been mostly – drawing maps

I have recently revised my approach to the Peninsular War e-mail campaign to try to engage the players a bit more.

Rather than insist they sit in their HQs awaiting reports of engagements they never saw, now whenever there is a contact on the master map between any more than scouts and messengers I will prepare a detailed game map of the 10 mile x 10 mile map square.

My copy is gridded in hexagons so that any part may be quickly copied to a wargame table or the Commands & Colors board as required.  The player in residence or who has scouted the area will receive a tracing, gridded in 1 mile squares.  The player entering the area will receive a tracing of the main roads and rivers, town and hilly areas.  The players are then demoted to the position of the senior man on the spot and asked for orders.

Results of any ensuing conflict will not be known to the player until he receives the local commander’s report or reads about it in the newspapers.

Sample map for the occupying player
Sample map for the occupying player
Sample map for invading player
Sample map for invading player

Added to this activity I have (some might say foolishly) started up another campaign to umpire.  Trying to get away from always playing Napoleonic games I resurrected my Operation Sealion campaign.  I started to play this solo some time ago, but thought an opponent would be a good idea.  Then I realised that there could be no secrecy, so I found a second player and I am now the umpire.

This campaign is run using a linked area system with 65 defined 6ft x 4ft tabletops.  I have a campaign book with the orders of battle and small maps of the areas.  I have started to create the maps for the game using the drawing tools in Microsoft Excel.  I use this tool because it enables me to add positions of troops later and to annotate the map using the “comments” function. Also I can keep all the maps, orders of battle, timelines and notes in one editable file.

Here is a sample map, gridded in 1 foot squares for the players and hexagons for me.

A wargaming map created in Excel
A wargaming map created in Excel

Blücher plays Commands & Colors

I have owned a copy of Sam Mustafa’s “Blücher” rules for five days and already started to bugger about with them.  Not because there is anything wrong with the rules, but I wanted to see if I could adapt them to my normal hexagon-based playing tables in 2mm and 6mm.

I am pleased to say that very little adaptation is needed.  As a first test I tried the rules with a scenario from Commands & Colors Napoleonics and the here is the result.

I made a few cock-ups in interpreting the rules, but I have to say that was my own fault.  These are probably the clearest, best laid out set of rules that I have ever read.

Blücher plays Commands & Colors

Battle of Busaco, 20th June 1808

This was the first engagement of any size in the Play-by-Email campaign of the Peninsular War.

It was a clash in Portugal between Wellesley’s forces moving south from Boialva to occupy Busaco and Delaborde’s division moving north to occupy Boialva.

The attached battle report was sent to the commanders after the action, using cardboard markers on the original battle map sent to them.  The actual battle was played with 6mm miniatures on a hexagon gridded terrain using Commands & Colors Napoleonics rules.

080620 Busaco Battle report with maps