Painting progress

This morning I have spent an hour painting the windows of 1/300 model buildings. I only spent an hour on the job because I detest painting the windows of 1/300 model buildings. And the reason why I detest doing it is because I am no bloody good at it.
That’s why there is no accompanying photograph.

Apart from trying to fit the paintbrush within the framework without wobbling, trying to get a realistic look eludes me. Normally I use a metallic gun metal paint. Today I tried darkening with Coat d’Arms “Magic Metal”, but it’s still not right. I was sitting in the garden comparing my efforts with the windows of surrounding houses. They are a sort of reflective dark grey, lightening a little when the sun comes out.

What they are not – and I can never understand the use of this on models – is blue. I frequently see this and have bought professionally painted models with glaring blue models, so I am guessing it is a convention amongst painters.

The most outrageous example was on the timber temporary buildings used at the Waterloo 200th anniversary re-enactment, where full-sized windows were painted bright blue. Why?

But, until I can get it right, who am I to criticize?

Wargame Progress – Market Garden

Back into my 6mm gaming mode I am setting up the battlefield for the next game in the Market Garden campaign.

About 1/6 of the table is a built-up area and I have populated it with a set of model buildings from my store. Some of these are most inappropriate for the Netherlands, particularly the Kentish oast houses, but I am taking the opportunity to paint every building taken from the box before replacing the wrong’uns with more geographically relevant structures.

So for the time being, the area looks like this:

This is a mixture of buildings from Various manufacturers and some home printed models.

Painting continues…

Getting the look right

Sometimes I play my wargames with mediocre models on mediocre terrain, but not often.

Nowadays a lot of my games are played using home-produced gaming tokens on a recycled board game map.  I would like to spend more time creating good terrain with good models, but I seem to have to many irons in the fire.

However, when I do play a “proper” game with 6mm models, I like to get the look of the thing as good as I can.  For example, this is from an e-mail campaign of Operation Sealion, the German invasion of Britain in 1940.

The German player was sent three “postcards” before the game, on the basis that they had been found for sale in the post office at Lewes, captured the previous evening.  These photographs are taken directly from the 1:285 scale wargame table.  Only the “sky” has been blurred to remove the background shed planking.