Wargaming activity

A wargaming update

Today, apart from my regular daily update on World War Two as a documentary and a map gaming project I managed a little painting and preparation.

First I found the 1/600 Lancaster models that had failed to successfully acquire a magnet to attach to their flying stand and tried a new application. This is a particularly difficult prospect, fighting the strength of “Gorilla Glue” against the desire of every “rare earth” magnet to fly off and find the nearest piece of steel.

Then I applied a wash of “Coat d’Armes” Russian Brown paint to several 1944 allied tanks, including the failed 3d prints of Cromwell tanks that I now intend to use as destroyed tank models.

Alas no photographs – yet.

Market Garden. Feeling pleased

I have had a major clear out and tidy up of the Shedquarters, because tomorrow a group of young local lads will be visiting the Shedquarters to try their hand at a wargame for the first time. I am chucking one of them in at the deep end, as he has one company of Polish paratroopers with a 20mm AT gun against three companies of PanzerGrenadiers, one company of recruits and three batteries of medium/heavy artillery.

But they are hiding in the ruins of what used to be Arnhem. some pictures follow:

But still somehow this all looks too neat and tidy. I have to leave room to place the troop bases, but I would sill prefer a more “organic” look, especially after the destruction. The “aerial” shots make it look like the bulldozers have been in and it’s at least a month after the battle.

Ideas anyone???

Painting progress

This morning I have spent an hour painting the windows of 1/300 model buildings. I only spent an hour on the job because I detest painting the windows of 1/300 model buildings. And the reason why I detest doing it is because I am no bloody good at it.
That’s why there is no accompanying photograph.

Apart from trying to fit the paintbrush within the framework without wobbling, trying to get a realistic look eludes me. Normally I use a metallic gun metal paint. Today I tried darkening with Coat d’Arms “Magic Metal”, but it’s still not right. I was sitting in the garden comparing my efforts with the windows of surrounding houses. They are a sort of reflective dark grey, lightening a little when the sun comes out.

What they are not – and I can never understand the use of this on models – is blue. I frequently see this and have bought professionally painted models with glaring blue models, so I am guessing it is a convention amongst painters.

The most outrageous example was on the timber temporary buildings used at the Waterloo 200th anniversary re-enactment, where full-sized windows were painted bright blue. Why?

But, until I can get it right, who am I to criticize?

Wargame Progress – Market Garden

Back into my 6mm gaming mode I am setting up the battlefield for the next game in the Market Garden campaign.

About 1/6 of the table is a built-up area and I have populated it with a set of model buildings from my store. Some of these are most inappropriate for the Netherlands, particularly the Kentish oast houses, but I am taking the opportunity to paint every building taken from the box before replacing the wrong’uns with more geographically relevant structures.

So for the time being, the area looks like this:

This is a mixture of buildings from Various manufacturers and some home printed models.

Painting continues…

Middle Eastern buildings for 6mm

I cannot remember if it was Bob Cordery or Chris Kemp who recently alerted me via their blog to the board game Santorini.  Anyway, I ordered a copy forthwith.

Forget the game.  In the box there are component to make buildings:

  • 22 ground floor/level 1 square pieces;
  • 18 first floor/level 2 square pieces, which can also be stacked together to make higher structures or sit on the ground as houses in their own right;
  • 14 second floor/level 3 octagonal colonnades with a square base;
  • 18 hemispherical cupolas.

That’s enough for a decent sized town, and for less than 25 quid!

All the sections are hollow and the first two will take a 2cm x 2cm base of 6mm figures inside or on the roof.

In the photo’ below are the four components and one full building.  A 6mm Irregular Miniatures unpainted insurgent is added for scale.  Incidentally, each face of the first two levels is different, to add some variety to the street.

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A lick of paint and these will do nicely, thank you.

Market Garden: First Contact