Serendipity and repurposing

It is a well known fact that in our household very few purchases (except food) are used for their intended pupose.  So it was no surprise that when I spotted in the centre aisle of our local Lidl a pack of brown felt pads for the protection of shiny floors against furniture legs for less than 2 pounds/dollars/euros that I snapped them up for potential wargames use.

(I since bought a supplementary pack of beige ones, which have vanished after arriving home.)

The pack has circular pads of 32x10mm, 36x15mm and 48x20mm; square pads of 20x20mm and one sheet 200x200mm.  All are about 2mm thick.

Felt pads. 15mm versions used up.

Coincidentally, within a week I needed to create for the Market Garden campaign a wargaming area of heathland in 6mm.

Some time ago I bought from eBay some Chinese model trees as an alternative to the “flocked bottle brush” type of which I already have plenty.  Examples below.

In the pack were lots of tiny trees which remained in the box for potential future use.

“Aha!” thinks I, “This is my serendipitous moment.”

By twisting the miniscule tree trunks together and pressing them onto to the sticky side of the felt pads I managed to create  clumps of bushes.  The felt underside helps prevent them from being inadvertantly moved against the flocked base terrain hexagons.

I may decide to use my previously described method of coating the bushes with diluted PVA glue and baking in the oven at a low heat to solidify the models, but for the time being they will suffice, when properly placed, interspersed with occasional trees, to represent my heathland.

Battle at Arnhem

18th September 1944.  06:00.  Dawn, Weather: good.

The battle for the Arnhem road bridge continued with elements of 2nd and 3rd Battalions, Parachute Regiment of 1st Brigade, 1st British Airborne Division, combined with the 1st Airborne Reconnaissance Squadron holding the northern approaches.

From the west 1st and 11th Battalions of the Parachute Regiment were trying to break through to the bridge to support the defence and to bring much needed  supplies.

On the German side 16th SS Training Battalion, supported by the Bridge Defence Company, were trying to block any reinforcements from the west.

At the same time 1st (armoured) Battalion, 9th SS Panxergrenadiers, attacked from the north-west.

9th SS, aware of the need for speed in cutting off the enemy attack, charged down the road in their half-tracks until the first vehicle was knocked out.  At that point the infantry de-bussed and deployed to attack the enemy in house-to-house combat.

The battle see-sawed back and forth.  The Bridge Defence Company was soon wiped out, but the 16th Battalion kept up the pressure until 9th SS could take up the attack.  The British reinforcements struggled on and made contact, but were soon pushed back, struggling to hold the road to the drop zone.

The artillery of 10th SS Panzer Division began to register, not only again the British paratroopers, but also on the homes of the citizens of Arnhem, as street after street burst into flames and fell into ruins.  This became as much of a hindrance to the Germans’ advance as did the defence of the enemy.

After two hours or so, the British had fallen back to a small perimeter stretching from the bridge approach to the road north of the river.

Continue reading Battle at Arnhem

Different approaches to wargaming

i was recently able to take a brief look at Chris Kemp’s model collection and how he organises it . See http://www.notquitemechanised.com

Chris has set his battle scale at (I believe) 1 unit/base =1 battalion.  My basic scale is 1 strategic unit = 1 battalion, and 1 tactical gaming unit is the company of 2-4 platoon bases.

But there is still so much that all wargamers can learn from each other’s gaming methods.  If I have taken nothing else from Chris’s collection, I have learned about how to box and categorise units.  With my gaming method I do not have the luxury of identifying each individual unit, but I can at least store and label units as “Rifles, MG, Mortars, HQ, AT”, etc., with their nationality and type (Para, Regular, SS, Mountain, Commando) and so on included.  In one box I can store 12 platoons or 16 vehicles.  I am finding this is a great way to proceed.

in the same way, small terrain may be stored.

Between battles

Here is my game board after storing the houses, trees and other super-surface elements, and following deconstruction of the hexagonal tile gaming surface.

Terrain tiles are sorted by type and ready to return to their “Really Useful Boxes”, which will be sorted and organised one day.

Yesterday it looked like this:

And very soon it will represent open farmland, heath and woods with a major road, several minor roads and a railway junction.

I am getting really organised for the future, viz:

These plastic playing card boxes, combined with larger storage boxes, have revolutionised my 6mm game storage.

Anachronisms and organisation

Someone on Channel 5’s “Great British Model Railway Challenge” first episode commented that in the recent film “Dunkirk”, the characters boarded a 1960s train.

Sorry, but that film began to lose me within the first two minutes when our hero walked past an obviously late 20th century building. I think the producers or directors may have been too caught up in the actual location to seek a realistic location.

And today, while clearing up and meticulously filing (yes – I am getting organised) models from my most recent wargame I have “The Cockleshell Heroes” on the TV in the background. A gratuitous and unnecessary* side shot of a German warship clearly bearing a British frigate reference number. Showing the crew wearing German hats a few moments later does not rectify the glaring error.

But while organising my 1:285 and 1:300 scale models I see that I have far too many 1940 Germans representing 1944 types – exactly like most film costume designers.
And I have created Arnhem with British church ruins and Normandy shops. Who am I to criticise?

Incidentally, during a TV advertisement break in the film I was informed that Colgate toothpaste is created by professionals. Well, that’s another worry resolved!

*Gratuitous and unnecessary. Is that tautology? I stand open to correction from fellow pedants.

Arnhem 75th Anniversary.

I am making plans to travel to Arnhem next September for the 75th anniversary of Operation Market Garden.

My current plan is to camp near Arnhem on a “one man and his dog” basis, from 16th to 23rd September 2019, attending whatever commemorations we can get to and visiting the sites and museums.

But I wonder if any of my blog followers have a similar interest, and would be prepared to share a car and a tent (or even a caravan if finances allow) for a week on a shared cost basis with a curmudgeonly old git and an over-friendly dog.

If interested, please send an e-mail to greywhiskers@me.com with the title Arnhem75, and we can discuss options.

Organisation, Dog issues and wargaming

Yesterday I spent a lot of time installing shelving units to my shed, during which I dropped my best screwdriver into an inaccessible position.

After eventually detaching the magnet elements from an LED work light, I was able to attach them to a line of linen thread and retrieve the driver,

I then set to to mow the front grass area, during which Sparky managed to sprain his front right ankle.  One trip to the vet, a pain killer injection, a dose of pills for the next week, and a fifty quid bill later, he is jumping about like a young puppy, while I am supposed to keep him on bed rest.

And so back to the wargaming:  I started a confused solo tabletop urban battle this morning between elements of 1st and 4th Parachute Brigades of the British 1st Airborne Division and elements of 2nd SS Panzer Division and local forces in the Arnhem area.

The result, after 30 minutes game time and a morning’s gaming and documentation, hangs in the balance.