Painting Blog 26/12/18-17/01/19

Just to prove that I have not been idle for the past 4 weeks, this is what I have been preparing for various wargames.  I must remind readers that I am a wargaming butterfly, in that I have may projects active at all times.  However, my priority is to keep the “Market Garden” campaign active for my five on-line Generals.

So, what have I painted and modelled since Christmas?  For reference, any photographs below on a gridded board are displayed on a 2″ x 2″ (5cm x 5cm) grid.

Painting and modelling projects in the last four weeks

WW2 German 6mm Adler Panzer Grenadiers.

16 Platoons of 4 figures each.  To be painted in late war camouflage smocks.

26th December:  Models sorted, bases labelled.

27th December:  Figures glued to 2cm square plastic bases using UHU contact adhesive.  Snipped corners from some bases to indicate weapon type.  Milliput added to bases to help strengthen the contact.

28th December:  Basecoat (Vallejo WW1 German Field Grey) applied to figures.

29th December: Bases painted for urban setting.   Uniform Grey overall, sprinkled with fine sand, then “splodged” with Vallejo Green Grey.

30th December:  Flesh tone added to faces and hands.

31st December: Repainted hands and faces with lighter flesh colour (Coat D’Arms Flesh).  Rifle barrels painted with Coat D’Arms 142 Gun Metal.

1st January:  Stippled smocks with Vallejo 70.875 Beige-Brown.  Stippled smocks and some helmets with Coat D’Arms 209 Dark Green.

4th January: Brick wall ruins on bases painted Coat D’Arms 509 (Brick Red?).  Black leatherwork painted Coat D’Arms 102.

6th January:  Gas mask cases painted Coat D’Arms 142 Gun Metal.  Army painter Matt spray paint applied.  Unit Finished.

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WW2 1944 Polish Parachute Battalion

16 Bases of 4 Infantry; a mix of Adler British Paras and British Marines.

15th January:  Glued troops to bases.  Painted bases Coat D’Arms Grass Green .  Base Coated Figures Coat D’Arms 537 Faded Khaki.

17th January:  Rifle stocks painted Coat D’Arms Horse Tone Chestnut.  Helmets painted Vallejo 382 Reflective Green.  Faces painted Coat D’Arms Dark Flesh.  Dabbed smocks with Vallejo 70.782 Chocolate Brown.  Dabbed smocks with Coat D’Arms 223 Chestnut.  Trousers overpainted Coat D’Arms 225 Khaki.  Weapons painted Coat D’Arms 142 Gun Metal.

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Blindheim Project.  6mm Irregular Miniatures troop blocks.

Lt-Gen. Horn.  Mounted General with 3 footsoldiers carrying a flag)

31st December: Horse painted Vallejo 70.875 Beige-Brown.  Coats painted Coat D’Arms 211 Light Grey.  Base painted Coat D’Arms 209 Dark Green.

1st January: Musket barrels painted Coat D’Arms 142 Gun Metal.

17th January: Faces and hands painted Coat D’Arms Flesh.

Danish Foot Brigade. 3 blocks of 18 musketeers + 3 man flag base.

6th January: Black wash to all. Diluted Coat D’Arms Black 102.  Command base. Boots painted black.  Faces and hands painted Coat D’Arms 213 Flesh.

7th January: Coats painted Coat D’Arms Grey 236.

17th January: Musket Barrels painted Citadel Mithril Silver

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 American Civil War 20mm Plastic Figures.

Two Union Regiments of 5 bases (15 figures each).  Part-finished.

31st December: Repainted musket stocks Coat D’Arms 225 Horse Tone Brown

1st January: Repainted musket barrels Coat D’Arms 142 Gun Metal, Touched up bases with Coat D’Arms 209 Dark Green.

4th January:  Backpacks, cartridge boxes and belts painted Coat D’Arms 102 Black.  Sprayed with matt varnish.  (Will be resprayed gloss for a “toy-soldier” appearance.)

3rd Maryland Regiment  8 bases of 3 figures each.

9th January:  Musket barrels painted Coat D’Arms 142 Gun metal, Card bases painted Coat D’Arms 209 Dark Green.  Sprayed with Rustoleum clear matt varnish.

13th January:  Bread bags painted Vallejo 886 grey-green.  Trousers painted in various greys and browns.  Bases touched up with Polyvine Acrylic Enamel 52 Brunswick Green.

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Terrain for “Market Garden” campaign.

City river bank hexagon tiles.

2nd January

Five existing river hex tiles masked and one point sprayed with grey stone effect paint.  (Will need a touch-up by brush – stone effect spray cans only work well the first time).

Two railway sloping embankments started.  Cork tile sections cut, glued and clamped.

5th January:  Tried to cut cork embankments to form slope.  Failed.  Designed similar shape for 3d printing and printed two sloping embankments.  A partial failure as the bottom of the piece was curved, so I inverted them.

7th January: Overpainted the city river banks with light grey “tester pot” paint.

14th January:  Glued Leven Miniatures rail sections to sloping embankments.  Re-glued rail sections to sloping embankments!  Ordered more hexagons from Kallistra.  (Plain Blue single tiles).  Spotted new half-hex tiles, and ordered them too.  Made side slopes of rail embankments from Milliput.

15th January:  Painted and flocked railway embankments.   Added streaks of PVA to blue hexagon tiles for wave/river effect.  Glued railway sections to polder/swamp tile for rail crossing with embanked road.

16th January:  Discovered I was using the wrong bridge for the Arnhem Rhine rail crossing.  Dug out different bridge and added Leven Miniatures resin rail sections.

17th January:  Black washed rail sections on the sloped embankments.  Railway sleepers (railroad ties) painted Vallejo 70-872 Chocolate Brown.  Rail track tops painted Coat D’Arms 142 Gun Metal.

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1940 3mm German force.

Two SIG33 15cm Self-Propelled Guns.

6th January:  Black wash overall with diluted Coat D’Arms Black 102.

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WW2 Naval

Sinking destroyer token (3d printed)

6th January: Black wash overall with diluted Coat D’Arms Black 102.  Deck painted Coat D’Arms Flesh 213.  Bottom of hull painted Coat D’Arms 509 Brick Red.

7th January: Superstructure and gun turrets painted Coat D’Arms 236.

17th January.  Repainted hull and superstructure darker grey.  Repainted deck with a darker tone.

HMS Warspite (prepainted model from Axis & Allies Naval)

13th January:  3d printed base (2 x 6cm hexagons adjoining, 2mm deep).  Repainted hull and superstructure with Vallejo 886.

15th January.  Spray-painted base with 2 shades of blue.

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WW2 1/600 Aircraft

De Havilland Mosquito, Focke-Wulf 190d.

6th January:  Painted all aircraft Coat D’Arms 211 Light Grey.  Poor coverage.  Maybe the models should have been washed first?

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6mm Commission Figurines MDF

French Revolutionary War, 24e, 56e, 90e de Ligne.  Part finished.

13th January:  Painted white coat turn-backs and breeches.

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That’s all Folks!

And now back to the painting table…

 

A review of 2018 from my blog.

2018 review

January.

I was recovering from a prostate cancer operation and moving into the new man-cave, and was plodding through a game of the Battle of Brighton, September 1940.

I also started work on game tokens for Memoir ‘44 games, using 19mm plastic bases and 3mm models.

February

I worked on the forces for my fourth battle of the whole of World War Two, on 4th September 1939. The game has still not been played.

I also playtested Black Powder rules in preparation for the Donald Featherstone memorial game of Chancellorsville.

March

Apparently nothing happened in March.

April

I started a new play by e-mail campaign of Operation Market Garden. As a precursor to the main campaign XXX Corps began the advance towards Valkenswaard.

May

The campaign continued with two engagements on the tabletop.

A US parachute infantry battalion took out a FlaK position and the british glider-borne recce squadron captured the road bridge at Arnhem.

June

In June nothing happened. I guess I was reenacting.

July

Day 1 of the Market Garden campaign was complete, and day 2 dawned. Battles were expected at both Nijmegen and Arnhem bridges. I was experimenting with 3d printing of artillery.

August

Apparently quite a lot happened. Market Garden pushed on. But…

I prepared for an ACW boardgame, still unplayed.

I worked on radar pylons for Sealion, still unfinished.

4th September 1939 is still waiting to be played.

The 6mm Napoleonic MDF figures have moved on a little.

We did have a good weekend re-enacting in Northumberland, spoilt by an overnight raid on the campsite in which several expensive items were stolen.

September

We spent a week chilling out at the Blenheim Palace Horse Trials.

I reported on quite a lot of terrain building using Kallistra Hex tiles and Leven Miniatures 6mm railway, and how to make city hexagons.

I actually got to play a wargame in the new city terrain of Arnhem.

October

I realised that while criticising film directors for accuracy I make far worse errors on my wargame tables.

Planning began for attendance at next year’s Arnhem 75 commemorations.

I got a bit irate about news and politics. In fact comments on the news began to take over the blog.

I did get to fight two more campaign battles around Arnhem.

November

I played a solo game moving the Market Garden campaign on, and created a naval game which I played with my young friend Ben. I’m 64, he’s 23, but we manage to play wargames with a similar attitude,

December

XXX Corps got back into the Market Garden action with an attack across the Wilhelmina Canal, during which the bridge at Son was destroyed. Bridging equipment was brought up, but alternative routes were sought.

I started to produce naval game tokens with my 3d printer.

I spent quite a lot of time watching nostalgia movies and prepared for Christmas…

Spanish equestrian artist brings his show-stopping act to London | Daily Mail Online

The Barcelona-based equestrian artist Santi Serra will perform his unique routines to the 90,000-strong audience at the world-renowned show running from December 13-19.
— Read on www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4027278/Spanish-equestrian-artist-communicates-animals-sleeps-stables-brings-stopping-act-London.html

I just watched this performance and was totally blown away by the demonstration of the training and trust between man and horse, and dog.

For Wargamers – forming square

For any wargamers who think that you can form a nice, neat square in one turn, this sequence of photographs show what actually happens when something like a half-battalion is approached by a troop of cuirassiers.

http://thomason-photography.net/Waterloo/CavalryAttack2015/

Note how the light company  and the Rifles decided to form their own defensive clumps because there simply was no time to safely reach home.

This then gave the rest of us a problem because there was a light company sized hole in the rear of our square!

Incidentally, talking to one of the spectators the next day, he told me that he watched this incident and said to his wife “Look at those chaps – they’re not going to make it.”, which was very much my own feeling (in the square) at the time.

Old Technology

Found in the attic

While digging out our advent tree from the attic I came across my old portable typewriter.

I bought this machine from Argos en route to a re-enactment event in the late 1980s or early 1990s, simply because I was the “Adjutant” for Sir Thomas Blackwell’s Regiment of the English Civil War Society at the time and the monthly newsletter was due the next week.

Photographs exist of me, dressed as a 17th century peasant, furiously typing away at the front of my tent on a Saturday evening in order to meet the copy deadline.

The following Monday evening would see me at our office photocopier running off 100 copies, followed by a late session folding, stapling and enveloping the results.

On Tuesday I would print the address labels and get stuff posted.

Aah, those were the days…

Cyber-Spying? There are easier ways.

Forget cyber-spying….

What does your postman know about you?

Today I delivered my car for a post-accident financial check-up.
The body-shop manager greeted me in a friendly way. We actually occasionally meet as dog-walkers locally.

His first question was: “Have you walked the dog, and is he in the car?”.
His idea was that I could walk Sparky while his chaps examined the damage.
I replied that I had come prepared to walk Sparky home if they needed to hold the car.
He said: “Not all the way to xxxxxxx”
I looked surprised.
He said.: “No. 7 isn’t it. Mr Wisken? I used to be your postman.”

Unexpectedly I got a small courtesy car, with permission for Sparky to use the back seats (“He’ll be OK”).
In fact I made Sparky scramble into the boot area after folding the seats forwards.

But it was a lesson that not only computers know all about you, but also much friendlier local folks, and what can tell more about you than your postal deliveries??

Cold callers

Don’t we all love those telephone calls that come right in the middle of something we are deeply engaged in, be it painting, modelling, reading or simply watching TV?

No, we don’t.

I have devised a quick question list for those annoying people, based on their own methods.

What is your reference number?

 I see.  Before we proceed I have to ask you a few security questions:

          Your full name

          The first line of your address

          Your postcode

          Your date of birth

          Your mother’s maiden name

 Thank you.  How may I help with your enquiry?

In practice, I rarely get beyond line 2.  Most hang up on line 1.

I have other methods.  If it sounds entertaining I will keep them on the line for no tangible result.  My best ever was someone offering me a better mobile telephone package than the one I had: handset provided by my employer and calls (within reason) paid for by my employer.  He elaborated on the potential savings, etc., etc.  Naturally I did not reveal my actual package for about 15 minutes.  Then I was called “a naughty man who has wasted my time.”  I replied that he had called me to waste my time and I thought we should compete on equal terms…. [click, silence].

My shorter response is: “If I did not call you, then clearly I do not need your services.  Goodbye.”