A bit of painting

Today I have been painting with (I think) Coat d’Arms 515 Iron Grey.  The label has faded so this is my best guess.

Whatever it is, I have painted the roof tops of my square and hexagonal town outlines for gridded wargames, touched up several roofs on my “tiny towns” and base coated some 3mm WW2 German guns and prime movers.

Oh – and relabelled the paint bottle. 🙂

The Pedant revolts again

A local estate is holding an open day in the near future.

I don’t know if the printer of the publicity leaflet ran out of punctuation marks but they have left me confused.  Apparently the attractions on the day are:

“CREAM TEAS, PIMMS & ICE-CREAM GUIDED MEDITATION IN NATURE GAMES & COMPETITION FOR CHILDREN.”

I have no idea what “nature games” are, or how they involve meditation.  Is the meditation during the games to be guided only by ice-cream or by both Pimms and ice-cream?  Further clarification is required.

It might be worth the compulsory “donation” to a local charity as an entry fee simply to discover what one must do in the competition to win a child.

Recent Politics, and why I am fed up.

Note:  Much of the background information is for foreign readers, who have no idea what is going on in Britain…

With the ongoing chaos that revolves around “Brexit” (a term that I believe trivialises the actuality), my thoughts are that it might be a “Good Thing” if the British parliament could endeavour to adopt the system of many other European countries: that of collaborative coalition between parties. Instead we have two large parties and several smaller ones that will engage in limited coalition to achieve a specific target, but are mainly deeply entrenched in their own policies.

In the UK we historically had two parties: the Whigs and the Tories. They evolved in the 20th century into the Liberals vs the Conservatives (still nick-named the Tories). Then the Labour Party emerged, representing the working class. Eventually the labour and Conservative parties became the main protagonists, with the Liberals sidelined.

Early in my “eligible to vote” timeline, the Liberals combined with some disgruntled members of (mainly) the Labour party to form the Liberal Democrats. Later smaller parties such as Plaid Cymru (Welsh nationalists), the Scottish National Party and the Green Party began to emerge.

In the 1970s the UK population was unusually allowed (instigated by the Conservatives) a referendum and voted to join the European Economic Community (EEC). Since then, through various treaties, the EEC has evolved to become something more similar to the USA, and several former Soviet states have joined. Not only has this become a larger power bloc, but is perceived by the Russians (their own power bloc having in the meantime disintegrated) as a potential threat as actual military integration between the EU states becomes a possibility.

Later, as the idea of leaving the new European Union (EU) – which was beginning to look like the USA or the former Soviet Union – began to raise its head, UKIP (The United Kingdom Independence Party) arrived on the scene.

The UK held another referendum in 2016 about whether to leave the EU. It was narrowly won by the “leavers” at 52% vs 48%. The instigator of the referendum, David Cameron, having not achieved his expected answer made a cowardly resignation speech and left the problem to the new leader, Theresa May. Unfortunately she deigned (possibly having no idea) to outline how we would implement the decision, merely stating “Brexit means Brexit”.

Two years of negotiation between the UK leader and the EU leaders went on. Then the leaving plan was presented to Parliament and rejected. Parliament then voted in an unprecedented step to take over the control of “Brexit”, but failed many times over many weeks to agree on any way out; or if the UK should leave at all; or indeed anything!

Next week we vote for our EU representatives, even though we do not expect them to actually take up their jobs before we leave in October 2019 (the latest deadline).
This is yet another expensive vote that will only serve to indicate the will of the public.

It looks increasingly like there will be a second referendum, costing umpteen millions of taxpayers money, to decide whether the UK will still go its own way or if we will remain as EU partners, in which case the last three years have been a total waste of parliamentary time and taxpayers’ money, both of which could well have been utilised to better public use.

 

Disgruntled with the “News”

This evening I was wondering if I was watching the news on TV or some satirical programme.

First I hear that the broadcaster Danny Baker has been summarily sacked by the BBC for publishing a photograph that would not be out of place on the front cover of “Private Eye” (a publication edited by another popular BBC personality).  It was labelled as “racist”, despite it being an archive photograph of two people and a chimpanzee.  Which race, I ask, was suffering any harm or insult from this photograph?

The next story involved a government department warning that people may have to move away from areas liable to flooding, while at the same time advising that building on flood plains is likely to double in the next 50 years.

Why?

Changing channel I heard that we would be hearing from a correspondent “momentarily”.  Sorry, but why bother to employ a correspondent if they are not to be allowed more than a moment to make their report?

I think I will stick to the satirical “news” programmes.  At least in those the contributors tend to think before they speak.

Light Gardening and Light Wargaming

Life has been rather quiet for the past few days.
I have not felt particularly able to do much, but I have been keeping the garden somewhat under control.

Whenever I work in the garden I am reminded of an old “Punch” cartoon dating from about 100 years ago.
Scene: An old man working in his garden. The local vicar looks over the hedge.
Vicar: “Isn’t it amazing what man can achieve with the aid of the Almighty?”
Gardener: “Aye Vicar, but you should’ve seen it when the Almighty ‘ad it to ‘Isself!”

On the wargaming front I have been designing, printing and sticking to blocks more labels for my “Memoir ’44” games.
Yesterday I produced reinforcements for the 1944 US Parachute Infantry and two forces for Poland in 1939.

 


These graphics (produced pixel by pixel using MS Paint) are printed onto A4 sticky labels, then cut out and attached to 13mm square (19mm for aircraft) plastic blocks. They are much easier to handle than cardboard counters and using tactical map signs lends a greater sense of authenticity to the game when playing on what is essentially a map view of the battlefield.

They lack the visual appeal of real painted toys on a modelled terrain, but I do get the games played sooner! Today, for example I played out a campaign scenario involving 13 companies of US Paras assaulting and defeating 2 companies of German Landsers. Not worth a full-blown battlefield set-up, and the whole thing was set up, played, documented and put away within 90 minutes.